Asteroid Nemesis

Nessus 7066

Nessus was a centaur who was ferryman at the river Euenos, where he carried passengers across the waters on his broad equine back. Nessus is most noted for his abduction and attempted rape of Heracles’ wife Deianeira. The couple came to the banks of the river and requested passage; Nessus took Deianeira first, then attempted to force himself upon her when they had reached the other side. Heracles saw the struggle, and shot Nessus through the breast with an arrow dipped in poisonous Hydra blood. As he lay dying, Nessus committed one final act of malice, and whispered to Deianeira to collect his blood, telling her it would ensure that Heracles remained forever faithful to her.

Years later, Deianeira suspected Heracles was having an affair, and so retrieved the blood from its vial and smeared it across a robe which she gifted to her husband. Heracles died an agonizing death as the Hydra’s poison mingled with Nessus’ blood burned the robe into his skin, killing him. After his death Zeus elevated Heracles to the Olympian pantheon to honor his many feats of strength and skill.

Astrologically, Nessus represents inappropriate or criminal sexual acts, including rape, as well as the general theme of “men behaving badly.” There is a component of family history and the transfer of sexual or other abuse from generation to generation. Additional themes include long-simmering resentments, deferred revenge, and abuse of trust.

Share this:
Alex Miller

Alex Miller is a professional writer and astrologer, author of The Black Hole Book, detailing deep space points in astrological interpretation, and the forthcoming Heaven on Earth, a comprehensive study of asteroids, both mythic and personal, due in 2018. Alex is a frequent contributor to “The Mountain Astrologer”, “Daykeeper Journal”, and NCGR’s Journals and “Enews Commentary”; his work has also appeared in “Aspects” magazine, “Dell Horoscope”, “Planetwaves”, “Neptune Café” and “Sasstrology.” He is a past president of Philadelphia Astrological Society, and currently a board member for the Philadelphia Chapter of NCGR.

Leave a comment